• 9

    Mar

    Parabolic Motion

    Projectile motion occurs when objects are fired at some initial velocity or dropped and move under the influence of gravity. One of the most important things to remember about projectile motion is that the effect of gravity is independent on the horizontal motion of the object. The independence of the horizontal and vertical components of the motion of the object is often used in these type of physics problems. It also accounts for the counter intuitive observation that a bullet fired horizontally from a gun takes the same time to fall to the ground as a bullet that is dropped from the same height. Parabolic motion on x-axis is uniform rectilinear motion while motion on y-axis is accelerated uniform rectilinear motion. Therefore, from the figure above we can obtain the following equation
  • 10

    Feb

    Kinematic With Vector Analysis

    If we observe a basket ball thrown into the basket, then the basket ball seems to move from one place to another. We can determine the position of the ball at any time by investigating the position of the ball as time function. The method of investigating and expressing object motion without reference to its cause, is the part of mechanics called kinematics. We will learn the kinematics vectors of a plane which involves two-dimensional vector analysis where the position vector, displacement, velocity, and acceleration are expressed in unit vector (x axis) and unit vector (y axis). A. Particle position on a plane How do you express the particle position which is moving on a plane (two dimensional)? To express the position of a particle which moves on a plane, we can use the unit vector. T
  • 30

    Dec

    Magnetic Materials

    A material is ferromagnetic if its atoms or molecules are magnets and they tend to group into domains. When a ferromagnetic material is placed in a magnetic ?eld, the lines of the ?eld ?nd it easier to pass through the material than the space around the material. Ferromagnetic materials have a large magnetic permeability. When the magnetic lines of force pass through the material, they act on the domains within the material and cause them to become aligned. At this point, the ferromagnetic material is a magnet in its own right and has its own magnetic ?eld that is aligned with and enhances the original magnetic ?eld. Ferromagnetic materials are so permeable to magnetic lines of force that they are able to react well with even very weak external magnetic ?elds. Materials such as iron, nic
  • 18

    Dec

    The Physics of Car Safety

    When a car stops suddenly, you keep going. This example of Newtons ?rst law of motion has been responsible for many traf?c injuries. Countless drivers and passengers have survived horrible crashes because they were wearing seat belts, and air bags have also played a major role. To understand the physics behind the design of air bags, imagine that the car you are driving is suddenly involved in a head-on collision. At the instant of impact, the car begins to decelerate. Your head and shoulders jerk forward, and the air bag pops out of its compartment. The bag must in?ate rapidly, before your head reaches the wheel, and then start to de?ate as your head hits it. This causes your head to decelerate at a slower rate. In addition, the force of your impact with the air bag is exerted over a wi
  • 18

    Oct

    Electricity and Magnetism

    Electric Charges and Magnetic Poles In spite of the similarities between electricity and magnetism, early experimenters considered them to be two entirely separate phenomena. It is true that both electrostatic and magnetic forces of attraction and repulsion become weaker with separation. However, they display many fundamental differences. Electric charge, the source of the electric force, moves easily through conductors, while magnetic poles, the source of the magnetic force, cannot be conducted. Almost anything can be given an electric charge. However, magnetic poles are normally found in only ferromagnetic materials. Like magnetic poles, there are two kinds of electric charges. Objects displaying electric charge usually have only one type of charge on them, positive or negative. Magnet
  • 8

    Aug

    Physics: A Window on the Universe

    Physics a Window on the Universe What makes physics so exciting is that you will be involved in thinking about how the universe works and why the universe behaves as it does. When asked to de?ne science, Albert Einstein once replied, science is nothing more than re?nement of everyday thinking. If you substitute physics for science in Einsteins de?nition, just what is the re?nement he is referring to? Using the language of mathematics to construct models and theories, physics attempts to explain and predict interactions between matter and energy. In physics, the search for the nature of these relationships takes us from the submicroscopic structure of the atom to the super macroscopic structure of the universe. All endeavours in physics, however, have one thing in common; they all aim t
  • 5

    Aug

    Superconductors and Magnetic Levitation

    Superconductors and Magnetic Levitation Levitating an object should be easy. All you need is a repulsive force strong enough to counteract Earths gravity. So why not use an electric charge or a magnet to create the repulsive force? Scientists have been thinking about this idea for years. In fact, the ?rst proposal to use magnetism to levitate vehicles was made in 1912, just one year after the discovery of superconductivity. Superconductors can conduct electricity with no resistance at all. In normal conductors, moving electrons collide with atoms, a process that resists the ?ow of current and causes the conductor to heat up. Superconductors can carry large currents without heating up, which means that they can be used to create powerful electromagnets. Once the current is introduced
  • 5

    Aug

    Go To Mars With Newton

    Go to Mars The Principia, Sir Isaac Newton proposed a way to launch an object into orbit. His method was to place a cannon on a mountaintop and ?re cannon balls parallel to Earths surface. By using more gunpowder each time, the cannon ball would ?y farther before falling to the ground. Newton imagined increasing the gunpowder until the cannon ball took off with such a great initial speed that it fell all the way around Earth the cannon ball went into orbit and became a cannon ball satellite. In fact, if the cannon ball was able to make it half-way around the world, it would continue to orbit. Today, scientists do not use cannons and gunpowder to launch rockets, but Newtons method and his laws still apply. Launching a rocket into orbit simply requires that the trajectory of its free fa
  • 9

    Jul

    Current, Resistance, Power

    electricity Electric charges Electric charges can be made to flow in a conductor. Such a flow of charges is called an electric current. Consider a small area element A, which might be the cross-sectional area of a conducting wire. If, in a small time ?t, ?q is the amount of charge that flows through the area element, then we define the current through that area to be I = ?q / ?t The SI unit for current is the Ampere, A. From the definition, we can see that 1 A = 1 C/s. A current can be related to the motion of the charges creating the current. Consider a conducting wire of cross sectional area A. Resistance If the current flows easily, we say that the object has a low resistance; on the other hand, if the current flow is small, then we say that the object has high resistance. We
  • 10

    Jan

    Momentum and Impuls

    collision A. Momentum In physics, momentum is related to the quantity of motion possessed by, a moving object. In this case, momentum is defined as the multiplication product of mass and velocity of the object. This, mathematically momentum can be determined as follows. p = m.v P = Momentum (kg.m/s) B . The Relation between Momentum and Impulse If a force (F) works upon an object with a mass of m at certain time interval so that the velocity of the object changes, then the momentum of the object will change. F= m a F= m ?v/?t If both parts of the above equation is multiplied by ?t, then the equation becomes. F ?t = m ?v F ?t = m (v2 v1 ) From the above equation, F.?t is called impulse and mv2-mv1, is called change of momentum. I = F ?t Where I = Impulse (N s ) F .
  • 24

    Jul

    SI Base Units

    The SI unit system consists of seven base units, with a number of other units derived from those foundations. Below are the base SI units, along with their precise definitions, showing why it took so long to define some of them. * meter (m) - The base unit of length; determined by the length of the path traveled by light in a vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second. * kilogram (kg) - The base unit of mass; equal to the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram (commissioned by the CGPM in 1889). * second (s) - The base unit of time; duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state in the cesium 133 atom. * ampere (A) - The base unit of electrical current; constant curre
  • 11

    Jul

    Polarization of Light

    Polarization is a property of light, or other electromagnetic radiation, that is primarily understood through studying the waves of the radiation. Polarization was discovered by Etienne Louis Malus, a French physicist in the early 1800s. Light is the range of electromagnetic radiation that humans can see. The wavelengths of light have a range from 380-750 nanometers. Electromagnetic radiation is radiation that is produced by electric and magnetic fields that travel together at the speed of light through space It is sometimes easiest to consider polarization if only one of the two sets of waves is considered the electric set. In unpolarized light, waves are in a jumble of directions. The waves have many different orientations around the direction that the light is going. Each wave is r
  • 11

    Jul

    Rainbow - Light Refraction

    A rainbow is merely a large band of parallel stripes, blended at the rims, which displays the full spectrum of colors that make up the sun’s white light. This brilliant display appears to the naked eye when the sun’s light breaks up as it passes through, the prism-like raindrops during a rain-shower. This immense, curved spectrum of light appears only when both the elements of sunshine and rainfall present. As the sunlight enters the falling raindrops, it breaks up into its true colors of red, orange, yellow, blue, and violet. These colors are always arranged according to their wavelengths, with red being at one end of the spectrum, and violet at the other. Once inside the droplet, the particles of colored light bounce from side to side, reflect off of the far side of the dr
  • 24

    Jun

    The Nature of Physics

    The world is full of experiences that cry out for explanations. Think, for example, of the colors of rainbows and soap bubbles, the vapor trails of high-flying aircraft, the fact that liquid water abruptly changes into solid ice at a certain temperature, the production of lightning and the thunder that follows it in a storm, the beautiful hexagonal symmetry of small snowflakes; all these, and a limitless list of other phenomena, fall within the province of the science of physics. The essence of science in general is the observation and exploration of the world around us with a view to identifying some underlying order or pattern in what we find. And physics is that part of science which deals primarily with the inanimate world, and which furthermore is concerned with trying to identify
  • 11

    Sep

    QUANTITIES AND UNITS

    A. Basic Quantities and Derived Quantities In physics there are two kinds of physical quantities, those are basic quantities and derived quantities. Basic quantities are the physical quantities the units of which predetermined, while the derived quantities are the physical quantities which the units of which are derived from basic quantity units. 1. Basic Quantities To communicate the result of a measurement of a certain physical quantity, a unit for the quantity must be defined. In 1960, an international committee agreed on a standard system of units for the fundamental quantities of science, called SI (Systme International). The SI is founded on seven SI base units for seven base quantities assumed to be mutually independent Base quantity Name Symbol length meter m mass ki
-

Author

Follow Me


Archive